The Business Athlete® - the most efficient and comprehensive way to create and sustain a high performing, high satisfaction culture.  

0 comments

Category:

In Leadership Development terms, even before Daniel Goleman in 1996, IQ had already started to give a lot away to EQ. Now SQ is getting more traction. But surely we need PQ too. And to integrate the lot. We've been integrating these explicitly for a long time. Here's a nice article from 2014 from Ricky Kujawa we saw recently - thanks Ricky. Look him up on LinkedIn. It's more personally focussed than a lot of our professional/ROI focus, but great background. Here's what Ricky posts: Leadership Intelligences SQ and PQ intelligences are rarely, if ever, talked about in leadership circles. but two that are include intellectual intelligence (IQ) and Emotional Intelligence (EQ) but evidence is growing that Spiritual Intelligence (SQ) and Physical Intelligence (SQ) are in fact major factors in determining the success of both leaders and organisations alike. In 1983 Howard Gardner, in his book Frames Of Mind, wrote about seven types of multiple intelligences in human beings. Gardner argues that there is a wide range of cognitive abilities, and that strength or weakness in one area or ability does not necessarily correlate to another intelligence. Gardner did not mention leadership in any of his multiple intelligences. However it is easily recognizable that to be an effective, efficient and productive leader, intelligence is quite naturally required. As such, there is now growing understanding that there are four kinds of intelligence that directly affect one’s leadership capabilities and methodologies to become a successful leadership practitioner. A holistic approach to leadership requires knowledge, i.e. intelligence, is these areas: Physical (PQ); Intellectual (IQ); Emotional (EQ); and Spiritual (SQ). They are interrelated in that they build on each other as one’s intellectual level increases over time through normal life experiences, academic achievements and professional expertise in our chosen fields. I would argue that the order of importance should be SQ, EQ, IQ and PQ. I might even argue that PQ come before IQ. IQ, I see as the basic foundations rather than the icing on top, The importance of Physical Intelligence (PQ) to the overall well-being of personal health and fitness. Physical Intelligence relates to Gardner’s bodily-kinesthetic intelligence. Furthermore, current studies and findings prove the necessity of maintaining a strong fitness level to improve longevity and body functions. PQ theory says that individuals need be knowledgeable in fitness, nutrition, and bodily wellness.Cindy Wigglesworth, in her book SQ 21, outlines from her research 21 key elements to Spiritual Intelligence (SQ); which she emphatically differentiates from religious and religious beliefs. She believes that SQ is developed over time, with significant practice. Spiritual Intelligence (SQ) SQ may be defined as: “The ability to behave with wisdom and compassion, while maintaining inner and outer peace, regardless of the situation.” Wisdom and compassion being the pillars of SQ. Deeper understanding of one’s own world view, life purpose, value hierarchy and controlling personal ego to consider the higher self. Self-mastery of one’s spiritual growth, living your purpose, values and vision, sustaining faith in and seeking guidance from a higher power. Universal awareness of world view of others, limitations and power of human perception, awareness of spiritual laws and transcendental oneness Social Mastery/Spiritual Presence: wise and effective mentor of spiritual principles; leadership change agent; making wise and compassionate decisions; and being aligned with the ebb and flow of life. Emotional Intelligence (EQ) Daniel Goleman, writing in What Makes A Leader, says that his findings have shown that the most effective leaders all have a high degree of Emotional Intelligence (EQ). The Center for Creative Leadership (CCL) says EQ is associated with better performance in nine different areas of leadership and management. Goleman’s research clearly shows that EQ is the sine qua non – absolute requirement – of leadership. Learn principles and practices for improvements in Self-Awareness and Self-Management: self-confidence; self-control; adaptability; initiative. Becoming more socially: empathetic; service orientation to others and the organization. Relationship Management: inspirational leadership practices; change management; conflict resolution skills; teamwork building techniques. Intelligence Quotient (IQ) Life-long learning is widely regarded as the increase in the intellectual level – IQ – of everyone wishing to improve one’s mind, professional expertise, and position in life. IQ contributes significantly to the personal “wisdom” one attains throughout the maturing process. Henri Bergson, in his book Creative Evolution reminds us: “To exist is to change, to change is to mature, to mature is to go on creating oneself endlessly.” Continuing education is a never-ending process in raising one’s intellectual level, i.e. IQ. Life-long learning is widely regarded as the increase in the intellectual level – IQ – of everyone wishing to improve one’s mind, professional expertise, and position in life. IQ contributes significantly to the personal “wisdom” one attains throughout the maturing process. Enrolling in classes of higher learning, obtaining a second degree, technical expertise improvement classes. Research intellectual topics such as philosophy, religion, symbolism, leadership, psychology. Surrounding yourself with people or organizations where life-long learning exists. This has been regarded as the key building clock in learning over a number of years but the importance of both EQ and at the moment to a lesser extent SQ and PQ have had lower profiles. This is however changing quickly in order to meet changing needs in succeeding generations and their needs and desires. Physical Intelligence (PQ) Ability to listen, identify and respond to internal messages about one’s physical self. Pain, hunger, depression, fatigue and frustration are examples. Learn about and understand the mind body connection. For instance: stomach telling mind it is time to stop eating; understanding the difference between the internal voice of wants vs. needs; the bodies need for exercise when we want to be lethargic. Determining our body’s perfect weight, fitness level and perfect diet. David McCuiston wrote on this topic in About Leaders in May 2013.

View Post
Tags :

0 comments

View Post
Tags :

0 comments

View Post
Tags :

0 comments

Category: Sport-specific

Jennifer Carson Marr and Stefan Thau did some worthwhile research on human performance this year (see the BPS website for the full article). They called it Falling from Great (and Not-So-Great) Heights: How Initial Status Position Influences Performance after Status Loss. Academy of Management Journal. They found that "compared with lower-ranked people, those higher up the pecking order find it more difficult to stomach a drop in status, and their performance can take a bigger nosedive as a result. "In many ways, individuals with high status are sitting pretty: more likely to receive praise, support, and positive influence from others; more likely to have positive life outcomes and perform better at work. You might expect them to be armed with the resources to cope with a threatening situation, such as being sidelined or demoted, and many psychologists would back you up. "But Jennifer Marr and Stefan Thau predicted that a status drop may have deeper repercussions for high-status individuals because their identity is likely to be more tied to their status, and identity threats suck up psychological resources and make focus harder." Exactly right in my view and from much of my experience. "These findings suggest that when a high status person takes a tumble, a vicious cycle may result, with poor performance making further status drops possible. Perversely, a strong identification with their status could actually make it harder to hold onto it." This seems to support the emerging thinking I've been having on the paradox of Mental Toughness vs Vulnerability to Debilitating Trauma/Derailment. You'd think these two things would be negatively correlated (go in different directions), but I reckon they are positively correlated more than we'd like to think, and for our high performance 'heroes' especially. I'm sure the solution is linked to updating self-definitions of personal identity beyond conventional 'Achiever' thinking (ref. Torbert and Rooke). Which makes developing long-term high performance partly a spiritual or transpersonal exercise. It's amazing how much of the work I'm currently doing touches on this paradox - a fascinating area.

View Post
Tags :

0 comments

View Post
Tags :

0 comments

Category: Sport-specific

News from British Rowing, plus plaudits for Neil Chugani, outgoing interim and ex-World Champion. We're delighted to announce that Andy Parkinson has been appointed as the new Chief Executive Officer of British Rowing, starting in early 2015. Parkinson brings first class credentials to the leadership of British Rowing. He is currently Chief Executive of UK Anti-Doping, having been the first appointment to that position in 2009. “I am delighted that Andy will be joining British Rowing as our CEO,” said Annamarie Phelps, Chairman of British Rowing. “Andy brings a wealth of experience and proven leadership capabilities in sporting governance, both national and international." Parkinson has built a highly successful career in multi-sport environments. During his time at UKAD, Andy has established UK Anti-Doping at the forefront of global anti-doping organisation and best practice. Prior to his leadership of UKAD, Andy headed the anti-doping operations at UK Sport as Director of Drug-Free Sport, having previously been its Head of Operations. He also has experience at the International Paralympic Committee, having been its Medical and Scientific Director. Prior to this he worked for Paralympics New Zealand, and has also served as President of New Zealand Wheelchair Rugby. He has been active in WADA’s Independent Observer programme, and the 2010 Tour de France. He is also the current Chair of the Ad Hoc European Committee for WADA. Parkinson said “It has been a privilege to be the first Chief Executive of UK Anti-Doping. I have had the opportunity to work with many highly skilled and committed individuals and am extremely proud of what UKAD has achieved over the past five years. "Rowing has been one of the most successful British Olympic sports and I am very much looking forward to leading the organisation as it strives for greater success, growth and participation at every level. Now is the time for me to seek a fresh challenge and it is an honour to be joining British Rowing as Chief Executive Officer.” Minister for Sport, Helen Grant MP, added: “I would like to thank Andy Parkinson for the huge contribution he has made to anti-doping in the UK. He has led UKAD superbly since its inception in 2009, strengthening links with law-enforcement agencies to take the fight to drug cheats and suppliers as well as educating thousands of athletes on the importance of clean sport in the run up to London 2012 and beyond. I wish him all the best in his new role as chief executive of British Rowing.” British Rowing has been led by Interim CEO, Neil Chugani, since the beginning of this year, and he will remain in post until Parkinson’s arrival to ensure a smooth transition. Chugani, a World Champion in the sport, as well as a former senior executive at Goldman Sachs, BSkyB Group PLC and BBC Worldwide, took on the role of CEO on an interim basis and played a leading role in the search for a permanent CEO. Chugani will be returning to his business career but will continue to support British Rowing in an advisory capacity. He also remains a Board member of UK Sport. Annamarie Phelps said: “British Rowing was fortunate indeed this year to be able to call upon someone of Neil’s outstanding professional experience, business acumen and personal passion for rowing, to take on the role of CEO on an interim basis. He has provided strong and effective leadership to the organisation during 2014, has made a significant and successful contribution to British Rowing, and I look forward to paying him a full tribute when he hands over his responsibilities.”

View Post
Tags :

0 comments

View Post
Tags :

0 comments

Category:

mobile_photo

View Post
Tags :

0 comments

Category:

mobile_photo

View Post
Tags :